Faculty Posters (including Post-Doctoral Fellows)

The Many Dimensions of Political Discourse on Taiwan among Chinese netizens: an analysis of 20 million Weibo posts

Huan-Kai Tseng,  Osbern Huang, Waybe Lee and Yu-tzung Chang (National Taiwan University)

Abstract: Can microblog data be a useful substitute for internet poll to gauge public opinion on politically sensitive...

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Ineffective Attribution Testing: An exploration of individual differences in cognition between Liberals and Conservatives

Stephanie Nail   (Stanford University)

Abstract: Previous literature has suggested that there are underlying differences in...

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What Matters to Voters? Examining Micro-Level and Macro-Level Drivers of Citizens' Economic and Political Evaluations

James Bisbee (Princeton University) and Jan Zilinsky (New York University)

Abstract: Voters form beliefs about the economy and politics on the basis of a potentially rich information set including experiences with own outcomes...

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Matching Estimation for Causal Effect on Compositional Outcomes

Kenichi Ariga   (University of Toronto)

Abstract: Compositional outcomes are not unusual in political science research....

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Using Latent Class Analysis to Explain Donor Behavior

Jay Goodliffe (Brigham Young University)

*Award for Best Faculty Poster*

Abstract: Why do citizens start donating to campaigns? Why do donors stop donating? Using latent class analysis and...

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I’ve Got the Power: A Survey of Issues Surrounding Statistical Power in the Design and Analysis of Survey Experiments

Clayton Webb (University of Kansas) and Cameron Wimpy (Arkansas State University)

Abstract: The power of a hypothesis test to reject a false null hypothesis is a basic concept of statistical inference that is introduced in most, if not all, introductory texts. Despite this, a systematic survey of work published in the American Journal of Political Science (AJPS), the American Political Science Review (APSR), the Journal of Politics (JOP...

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