Graduate Student Posters (Emerging Cohort, Applications)

Analyzing Gendered & Raced Editorial Scrutiny of Lawmakers in the U.S. and U.K.

Julia Bourkland and Vanessa Cruz Nichols (Indiana University)

Abstract: Content analyses in gender and politics scholarship find that female elites are often discussed in different and degrading ways in news media compared to their male counterparts, with additional intra-group differences between white female elites and female elites of color. Feminist political scientists have long critiqued the way women in...

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Cheap Talk or Circuit to the Legislature: Why Do Corporations Express Public Support for and Opposition Against Free Trade?

Dahyun Choi (Princeton University)

Abstract: Studies of lobbying demonstrate that sending costly signals can further enhance the credibility of the information conveyed by firms, and this characteristic of lobbying has made scholars assume that entering into the lobbying market is the most effective channel for firms to influence...

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Conjoint Analysis in Studying Descriptive Representation

Laura Felone, Khasan Redjabov and Eli August (University of Wisconsin)

Abstract: We replicate Teele et al.’s (2018) substantively important question about political representation with a recent...

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Distances in Latent Space: A Novel Approach to Analyzing Conjoints

Simon Hoellerbauer (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)

Abstract:  Recent work (Abramson, Kocak, and Magazinnik, n.d.) has shown the potential pitfalls of using conjoint analysis to understand aggregate preferences over alternative profiles. Adapting recent work that frames conjoint analysis in an IRT...

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Don’t Know, Don’t Care: Non-Attitudes in African Public Opinion

Blair Read and Paige Bollen (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

Abstract: Public opinion data can contain a wealth of information about how citizens evaluate and participate in politics. Yet, often respondents refuse to answer survey questions, or simply respond “don’t know” when asked about their opinion...

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Estimating the Dark Figure of Crime Using Bayesian Additive Regression Trees Plus Poststratification (BARP)

Isabel Laterzo (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)

Abstract: Studies of both crime victimization and violence often suffer from demonstrably unreliable crime figures. Consequently, researchers typically use homicide rates as an indicator to reflect all types of violence, despite this figure’s biases. The...

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Finding Social Media Trolls: Dynamic Keyword Selection Methods for Rapidly Evolving Online Debates

Maya Srikanth, Anqi Liu, Nicholas Adams-Cohen, Anima Anandkumar and R. Michael Alvarez (California Institute of Technology)

Abstract: Online harassment is a significant social problem. Prevention of online harassment requires rapid detection of harassing, offensive, and negative social media posts. In this paper, we propose the use of word embedding...

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How a Deep Neural Network Contributes to Learning Causal Graph and Forecasting Political Dynamics

Seo Eun Yang (Ohio State University)

Abstract: Nonlinearity has been considerably interested in time series analysis of conflict/opinion dynamics. However, handling unknown nonlinear interactions on time series data is a methodologically challenging task because traditional models such as VAR Granger analysis or B-SVAR...

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LAPD Community Safety Partnership: Impact Evaluation on Violent Crime Using Augmented Synthetic Control Models

Sydney Kahmann, Erin Hartman, P. Jeffrey Brantingham and Jorja Leap (University of California, Los Angeles)

Abstract: In 2011, the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD), in conjunction with other governmental and nonprofit groups, launched the Community Safety Partnership (CSP)....

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Legislative Networks and Agenda-Setting in the UNGA and UNSC

Sabrina Arias and Robert Shaffer (University of Pennsylvania)

Abstract: How do the agendas of the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) and United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) influence each other? Which of these foundational UN institution leads, and which lags? How often do these chambers devote attention to...

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Measuring Political Polarization in Mass Publics: The Cluster-Polarization Coefficient

Isaac Mehlhaff (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)

Abstract: Political polarization has become a key concern in many important topics within comparative politics, yet past research has reached little consensus as to its substantive causes and effects. Much of this disagreement, I argue, stems from the use...

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Pay attention to this! Explaining emphasis in legislative speech.

Oliver Rittmann (University of Mannheim), Tobias Ringwald (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology) and Dominic Nyhuis (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)

Abstract: Why do legislators sometimes deliver emphatic speeches and tedious monologues at other times? We argue that legislators make passionate appeals when...

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Religiosity and Secularism: A Text-as-Data Approach to Recover Jihadist Groups' Rhetorical Strategies

Luwei Ying (Washington University in St. Louis)

*Award for Best Graduate Student Poster - Applications*

Abstract: Radical Islamists as the major force of the current "wave" of terrorism pursue impact, not only attacks. Scholars, however, for decades have almost exclusively focused...

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Targeting and the Timing of Online Censorship: The Case of Venezuela

Ishita Gopal (Pennsylvania State University)

Abstract: In this paper I advance a theory to explain the timing of internet censorship in authoritarian regimes. Censorship as a means of digital repression has been on a rise across...

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The Moral Narrative of the European Sovereign Bond Crisis

Nicola Nones (University of Virginia)

Abstract: In this paper, I take a first step towards assessing if and to what extent the debt crisis has given rise to a moral narrative that starkly divides virtuous Northern European countries on the one side, and spendthrift, lazy Southern European ones on the other side. Such moral...

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The Persuasion Effect and Contrast Effect of Radical Right Voters – the case of Germany

Ka-Ming Chan (Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich)

Abstract: During the 2013-2017 electoral cycle, Alternative for Germany (AfD) emerged as a radical right party in the electoral market and it broke into thirteen subnational parliaments. This research investigates whether its voters shifted their ideological self-position in the rightward direction throughout these concatenated elections. This rationalization process, in which...

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The Politics of Science: Evidence From 19th-Century Public Health

Casey Petroff (Harvard University)

Abstract: How do governments decide between protecting public health and protecting the economy when a new disease threat emerges? I study this question using evidence from cholera epidemics in the 19th century. In the face of this new threat to public health, professional opinion was divided between...

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The Spread of Promotion of Political Violence on Twitter

Taegyoon Kim (Pennsylvania State University)

Abstract: Although social media contribute to political participation by enabling citizens to freely express and exchange political opinions, increasing concerns are raised about the...

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Voter Turnout and Campaign Mail Features

Marcy Shieh and Blake Reynolds (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Abstract:  The way images and text are presented to us can have a significant impact on how we are affected by the message contained in an advertisement. Therefore, we ask how does the formatting of campaign mail influence voter turnout? Using campaign mail from the 2018 primary and general elections in Texas, we examine the layout of campaign mailers. To do this, we leverage machine...

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