Graduate Student Posters

Supervised Learning Election Forensics With Multi-Agent Simulated Training Data

Fabricio Vasselai (University of Michigan)

Abstract: The main advantage of using Supervised Machine Learning (SML) techniques to detect election fraud would be resorting to model-free or model-ensemble approaches, instead of usual...

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Targeting and the Timing of Online Censorship: The Case of Venezuela

Ishita Gopal (Pennsylvania State University)

Abstract: In this paper I advance a theory to explain the timing of internet censorship in authoritarian regimes. Censorship as a means of digital repression has been on a rise across...

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The Consequences of Social Interaction on Outparty Affect and Stereotypes

Erin Rossiter (Washington University in St. Louis)

*Award for Best Graduate Student Poster - Applications*

Abstract: Americans increasingly dislike members of the opposite political party and associate negative stereotypes with them such as close-minded, mean, and hypocritical. Yet...

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The Heuristic Issue Voter: Issue Preferences and Candidate Choice

Gabriel Madson (Duke University)

Abstract: Issue voting, where citizens select candidates primarily for their positions on political issues, is a normatively appealing theory of voting. A public whose political behavior is driven by...

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The Moral Narrative of the European Sovereign Bond Crisis

Nicola Nones (University of Virginia)

Abstract: In this paper, I take a first step towards assessing if and to what extent the debt crisis has given rise to a moral narrative that starkly divides virtuous Northern European countries on the one side, and spendthrift, lazy Southern European ones on the other side. Such moral...

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The Persuasion Effect and Contrast Effect of Radical Right Voters – the case of Germany

Ka-Ming Chan (Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich)

Abstract: During the 2013-2017 electoral cycle, Alternative for Germany (AfD) emerged as a radical right party in the electoral market and it broke into thirteen subnational parliaments. This research investigates whether its voters shifted their ideological self-position in the rightward direction throughout these concatenated elections. This rationalization process, in which...

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The Politics of Science: Evidence From 19th-Century Public Health

Casey Petroff (Harvard University)

Abstract: How do governments decide between protecting public health and protecting the economy when a new disease threat emerges? I study this question using evidence from cholera epidemics in the 19th century. In the face of this new threat to public health, professional opinion was divided between...

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The Puzzling Politics of R&d: Signaling Competence Through Risky Projects

Natalia Lamberova (University of California, Los Angeles)

Abstract: Why do some leaders devote significant funds to research and development (R&D) even though such investments are risky, less visible to the public...

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The Spread of Promotion of Political Violence on Twitter

Taegyoon Kim (Pennsylvania State University)

Abstract: Although social media contribute to political participation by enabling citizens to freely express and exchange political opinions, increasing concerns are raised about the...

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Urban-Rural Divide in State Political Parties

Zoe Nemerever (University of California, San Diego)

Abstract: The urban-rural divide in American politics typically is presented as a comprehensive explanation for electoral outcomes. Yet, no research directly examines variations in the urban-rural divide across the states. This project is the first to quantitatively...

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Using Poisson Binomial Models to Reveal Voter Preferences

Evan Rosenman and Nitin Viswanathan (Stanford University)

Abstract: We consider a problem of ecological inference, in which individual-level covariates are known, but labeled data is available only at the aggregate level...

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Value Shift: Immigration Attitudes and the Sociocultural Divide

Caroline Lancaster (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)

Abstract: Socially-liberal attitudes towards cultural issues, such as women's rights, enjoy broad acceptance in Western Europe, particularly among younger generations. Yet, despite theoretical claims that immigration and multiculturalism would likewise become broadly...

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Violation of Bright Lines, Term Limit Evasion and Information Control

JunHyeok Jang (University of California, Merced)

Abstract: Constitutional “bright lines” are generally thought to serve as an important guard against democratic breakdown, because violations of these “bright line” institutions provide a focal point that facilitates mass coordination against a leader. In countries with term...

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Voter Turnout and Campaign Mail Features

Marcy Shieh and Blake Reynolds (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Abstract:  The way images and text are presented to us can have a significant impact on how we are affected by the message contained in an advertisement. Therefore, we ask how does the formatting of campaign mail influence voter turnout? Using campaign mail from the 2018 primary and general elections in Texas, we examine the layout of campaign mailers. To do this, we leverage machine...

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When Inequality Matters: The Role of Wealth During England's Democratic Transition

Ali Ahmed (New York University)

Abstract: Do democratic reforms confer equal benefits to all citizens? Or are the material gains from such transitions conditioned by pre-existing inequalities? In this study, I exploit quasi-random...

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Who Do You Think You’re Fooling? Examining the Internal Russian Disinformation Campaign

Sean Norton (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)

Abstract: While an extensive literature in both the academic and popular presses has examined the Russian state’s use of Twitter to influence the 2016 US...

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Who Gets Their Way in Coalition Policy?

Alessio Albarello (University of Rochester)

Abstract: In coalition governments, parties need to agree on a common position. Whose preferences pre- vail? I test alternative theories for the determination of the policy compromise in multiparty governments. I reject a prominent theory that coalition partners’ influence on policy is...

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