Graduate Student Posters

Finding Social Media Trolls: Dynamic Keyword Selection Methods for Rapidly Evolving Online Debates

Maya Srikanth, Anqi Liu, Nicholas Adams-Cohen, Anima Anandkumar and R. Michael Alvarez (California Institute of Technology)

Abstract: Online harassment is a significant social problem. Prevention of online harassment requires rapid detection of harassing, offensive, and negative social media posts. In this paper, we propose the use of word embedding...

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Multiplicative Interactions in Error Correction Models

Flávio Souza (Texas A&M University)

Abstract: Error correction modeling (ECM) is a common time-series strategy when both dependent and independent variables contain a unit root and are cointegrated. But one of its principal drawbacks is its inflexibility—since it requires that every independent variable enter the right-hand...

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Measuring Issue-Specific Preferences From Votes

Sooahn Shin (Harvard University)

Abstract: How can we measure issue-specific ideal points using roll-call votes? Ideal points have been widely used for measuring ideology, yet its nature of latent space makes it difficult to target a...

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Voter Turnout and Campaign Mail Features

Marcy Shieh and Blake Reynolds (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Abstract:  The way images and text are presented to us can have a significant impact on how we are affected by the message contained in an advertisement. Therefore, we ask how does the formatting of campaign mail influence voter turnout? Using campaign mail from the 2018 primary and general elections in Texas, we examine the layout of campaign mailers. To do this, we leverage machine...

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Agnostic Sensitivity Analysis

Christopher Schwarz (New York University)

Abstract: The threat of endogeneity is ubiquitous within applied empirical research. A `near Bayesian' method of sensitivity analysis is developed and implemented, overcoming a number of difficulties with existing approaches. The procedure targets the distribution of possible causal...

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The Consequences of Social Interaction on Outparty Affect and Stereotypes

Erin Rossiter (Washington University in St. Louis)

*Award for Best Graduate Student Poster - Applications*

Abstract: Americans increasingly dislike members of the opposite political party and associate negative stereotypes with them such as close-minded, mean, and hypocritical. Yet...

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Using Poisson Binomial Models to Reveal Voter Preferences

Evan Rosenman and Nitin Viswanathan (Stanford University)

Abstract: We consider a problem of ecological inference, in which individual-level covariates are known, but labeled data is available only at the aggregate level...

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Formalization of Political Analysis: Matrix of Possibles States and Strategies

Fernando Rocha Rosario (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México)

Abstract: In this paper I expose a technique which formalizes the political analysis using modal logic and theory of rational choice. For represent the...

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Pay attention to this! Explaining emphasis in legislative speech.

Oliver Rittmann (University of Mannheim), Tobias Ringwald (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology) and Dominic Nyhuis (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)

Abstract: Why do legislators sometimes deliver emphatic speeches and tedious monologues at other times? We argue that legislators make passionate appeals when...

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Changing the Dialogue: Candidate Position-Taking in Primary Elections

Rachel Porter, Sarah Treul and Maura McDonald (University of North Carolina)

Abstract: The record-high number of women who ran for the U.S. Congress during the midterm elections led many journalists to...

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The Politics of Science: Evidence From 19th-Century Public Health

Casey Petroff (Harvard University)

Abstract: How do governments decide between protecting public health and protecting the economy when a new disease threat emerges? I study this question using evidence from cholera epidemics in the 19th century. In the face of this new threat to public health, professional opinion was divided between...

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Who Do You Think You’re Fooling? Examining the Internal Russian Disinformation Campaign

Sean Norton (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)

Abstract: While an extensive literature in both the academic and popular presses has examined the Russian state’s use of Twitter to influence the 2016 US...

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The Moral Narrative of the European Sovereign Bond Crisis

Nicola Nones (University of Virginia)

Abstract: In this paper, I take a first step towards assessing if and to what extent the debt crisis has given rise to a moral narrative that starkly divides virtuous Northern European countries on the one side, and spendthrift, lazy Southern European ones on the other side. Such moral...

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Urban-Rural Divide in State Political Parties

Zoe Nemerever (University of California, San Diego)

Abstract: The urban-rural divide in American politics typically is presented as a comprehensive explanation for electoral outcomes. Yet, no research directly examines variations in the urban-rural divide across the states. This project is the first to quantitatively...

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A New Multilevel-Based Indicator for Party System Nationalization

Kazuma Mizukoshi (University College London)

Abstract: “Science is impossible without an evolving network of stable measures” (Wright 1997: 33), but to what extent should measures be stable? Though measures seem still stable as...

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