Graduate Student Posters

Sensitivity Analysis for Outcome Tests

Elisha Cohen (Emory University)

Abstract: Outcome tests, a method that can be used for evaluating bias in selection making processes, are especially useful when using administrative datasets that contain only observations after the selection process has occurred. I show the outcome test lower bound derived by Knox, Lowe, and Mummolo (...

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Cheap Talk or Circuit to the Legislature: Why Do Corporations Express Public Support for and Opposition Against Free Trade?

Dahyun Choi (Princeton University)

Abstract: Studies of lobbying demonstrate that sending costly signals can further enhance the credibility of the information conveyed by firms, and this characteristic of lobbying has made scholars assume that entering into the lobbying market is the most effective channel for firms to influence...

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Quantifying Triggers With Event Coincidence Analysis: An Application to Mass Civilian Killings in Civil War, 1989-2017

Angela Chesler (University of Notre Dame)

Abstract: Scholars of international relations, comparative politics, and peace and conflict studies are often interested in questions concerning the triggers of extreme political outcomes such as war, coups, and genocide. In a causal chain, a trigger is an immediate cause that can be...

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The Persuasion Effect and Contrast Effect of Radical Right Voters – the case of Germany

Ka-Ming Chan (Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich)

Abstract: During the 2013-2017 electoral cycle, Alternative for Germany (AfD) emerged as a radical right party in the electoral market and it broke into thirteen subnational parliaments. This research investigates whether its voters shifted their ideological self-position in the rightward direction throughout these concatenated elections. This rationalization process, in which...

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Learning From Likes: The Effect of Social Engagement Feedback on Politicians' Social Media Communications

Ryden Butler (Washington University in St. Louis)

Abstract: Considerable research indicates that politicians adapt their rhetoric in order to appeal to the preferences of their constituents. However scant research has examined this phenomenon in the context of politicians' social media communications. In this study I use...

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Priming Bias Versus Post-Treatment Bias in Experimental Designs

Jacob Brown (Harvard University), Matthew Blackwell (Harvard University), Sophie Hill (Harvard University), Kosuke Imai (Harvard University) and Teppei Yamamoto (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

Abstract:  It is now widely recognized that conditioning on variables affected by a treatment can induce post-treatment bias when estimating causal...

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Friend or Faux: Social Network-Based Early Detection of Fake User Accounts on Facebook

Adam Breuer (Harvard University), R. Eilat (Facebook Research), U. Weinsberg (Facebook Research)

Abstract: In 2019 alone, Facebook disabled over 6 billion fake user accounts. While early...

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(How) Do Elections Build States? Evidence from Liberian Electoral Administration

Jeremy Bowles (Harvard University)

Abstract: In contexts where the state otherwise has limited reach, effective electoral administration permits the projection of state authority and increases levels of state-citizen interaction....

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Analyzing Gendered & Raced Editorial Scrutiny of Lawmakers in the U.S. and U.K.

Julia Bourkland and Vanessa Cruz Nichols (Indiana University)

Abstract: Content analyses in gender and politics scholarship find that female elites are often discussed in different and degrading ways in news media compared to their male counterparts, with additional intra-group differences between white female elites and female elites of color. Feminist political scientists have long critiqued the way women in...

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Don’t Know, Don’t Care: Non-Attitudes in African Public Opinion

Blair Read and Paige Bollen (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

Abstract: Public opinion data can contain a wealth of information about how citizens evaluate and participate in politics. Yet, often respondents refuse to answer survey questions, or simply respond “don’t know” when asked about their opinion...

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Scaling the Youtube Media Environment Using Network and Text Data

Soubhik Barari (Harvard)

Abstract: In an era where many Internet news-seekers prefer to watch rather than read their news, YouTube plays an important role in mass political communication, but remains entirely unstudied by political...

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Collective Property Rights Reduce Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon

Kathryn Baragwanath and Ella Bayi (University of California, San Diego)

Abstract: In this paper, we draw on common-pool resource theory to argue that indigenous territories, when granted full property...

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Estimating Historical Election Results Under Counterfactual Electoral Systems

Samuel Baltz (University of Michigan)

Abstract: Despite the salience and importance of electoral system reform, both in the political science literature and in the contemporary politics of many democracies, little direct attention has been paid to the following question: how might the results of a specific election have been...

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Bias-Corrected Crosswise Estimators for Sensitive Inquiries

Yuki Atsusaka (Rice University), Randy Stevenson (Rice University) and Ahra Wu (Dartmouth College)

Abstract: The crosswise model is an increasingly popular survey technique to elicit candid answers from respondents...

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Legislative Networks and Agenda-Setting in the UNGA and UNSC

Sabrina Arias and Robert Shaffer (University of Pennsylvania)

Abstract: How do the agendas of the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) and United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) influence each other? Which of these foundational UN institution leads, and which lags? How often do these chambers devote attention to...

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